Tuesday, 14 July 2009

Edouard Mignan, Marcel Dupré and Jeanne Demessieux




Now it’s time for the next release with the recordings of Marcel Dupré and Jeanne Demessieux in Saint Mark’s Church, London. However, first we start with a recording with Edouard Mignan playing the first movement of Mendelssohns 6th sonata.


Edouard Mignan (1884-1969) was a French organist and composer. He was born in Orléans and 14 years old he became the organist of église Saint Paterne. He studied organ in Paris with Alexandre Guilmant and Louis Vierne and won the Grand Prix de Rome in 1912. He was organist at Saint-Thomas-d'Aquin from 1917 to 1935. He succeeded Henri Dallier as organist of la Madeleine in 1935 and held that post until 1962.
(From Wiki)

Edouard Mignan was succeded by Jeanne Demessieux in La Madeleine.
The technical quality of this recording is very poor and everything sounds very chaotic and distant. Also there were some difficulties transferring the second 78rpm side, so there is a big pitch problem there. I’ll try to get it fixed.

I know I’ve published the exact same recording of the Toccata and fugue in d with Jeanne Demessieux, but I think this transfer is a little bit better in quality, maybe due to the condition of the original 78rpm.

This release concludes with the two remaining Chorales by Franck with Marcel Dupré at the keyboard - see the first release with Dupré for the a-minor Chorale.

Once more a big thanks to Michael Gartz for the transfers and to Claus Byrith for the CEDAR and digital splicing.

(UPDATE: Thanks to organist Anders Riber, who has kindly provided the picture of Edouard Mignan)








Download detailed playlist

Download link:
http://www.ihorc.com/ihorc/IHORC-09/IHORC-09_-_Mignan_-_Dupre_-_Demessiux.rar

1 comment:

  1. Jeanne Demessieux Toccata and Fugue in D Minor played at St Mark's London record 78p=rpm Decca label K1635 AR11234 and AR11235 I found the record in my loft in a sorry state.I purchased it new (I am 84). In my mind it was a brilliant performance at the time and still my favourite.The record is probably unplayable but must kept it. Ben Gross

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